Thursday, 15 September 2016

The Vehme-Star, an Ario-Germanic Symbol



This article should be considered a supplement to my earlier one on the subject of Der Drudenfuss:
http://armanen.blogspot.co.uk/2014/02/the-drudenfu-ancient-germanic-symbol.html

There is considerable physical evidence for the use of this symbol, which Walther Blachetta considers to be a German and Germanic symbol (see Das Buch der Deutschen Sinnzeichen), in the architecture of mediaeval Germany. Blachetta gives an example of one on page 107 of his book as a Hofmarke of Jacob Schumacher (shoe maker/cobbler) of Aue in Oldenburg, dating back to 1604. Many of these Hofmarken date back to the time of the Armanen and much of this symbolism was preserved by Initiates in architecture whether the buildings had a sacred or secular use. As stated in my earlier article the symbol was recognised as a protective device but like all parts of our ancient lore this symbol was demonised by the Christian church and transformed into a symbol of 'evil', the 'devil', Satan etc. This distortion has been accepted almost without question and even to the extent that modern day 'Satanists' have adopted this as their symbol but in its revered aspect, thus adding to its supposed diabolic nature and intensifying it. Likewise the Wiccans (who cannot pronounce the word Wicca (witcha) have also adopted it as a symbol of their 'craft' but in its upright version.

The Germanic heathen community has also distorted the true understanding and meaning of this symbol by following the accepted propaganda that it is associated entirely with 'Wicca' and has nothing to do with the Germanic world. Folkish heathens in particular are guilty of propagating this error by ascribing it to a Jewish origin. This is all faulty thinking and it is without any doubt that pre-modern Germans considered it to be an ancient and beneficial symbol and this was especially the case with the Armanen. For those that doubt this fact I quote the relevant passage from Guido von List's Die Religion der Ario-Germanen in ihrer Esoterik and Exoterik:

"The pentads: The holy Fem (five), the five known elements (fire, water, air, earth, ether or aether), the five recognised senses (for, in fact, there are seven), the pentagram, the five brothers, the five maidens, the five men, the five nights, the five sons, the five winters, etc." (Translated by Stephen E. Flowers, PhD as The Religion of the Aryo-Germanic Folk)
In the German original Guido von List refers to the five fingers of the hand and that these five senses are represented by the Albenkreuz (elf cross), the Thrutenfuss or Femstern (Vehme Star)

It should be noted that this translation appears to be a much edited one as there are phrases and sentences in the German original which have not been translated. By comparison the translation numbers 55 pages whilst the German original has 97 pages! This emphasises my advice to would be Armanen to learn to read German and study the original source material for themselves! I once received a request from a person who wanted me to translate a whole book for just him from German to English! When I advised him to learn to read German and then obtain and study the original materials he lost interest! Wisdom and knowledge, particularly that of an esoteric nature must be EARNED and worked for. Those who expect to receive this for nothing are unworthy to become Initiates. I do recommend that my readers buy a copy of Dr Flower's translation if they can find one. Many of his works and translations are still out of print.

Guido von List in his masterwork, Das Geheimnis der Runen refers again to the pentagram but using different terminology:

"The five-angled star, the Vehme-Star, the Truthenfuss (truh = turn, fuss = foot) is the hieroglyph of 'revolving or turning generation', of 'rebirth'- one of the most important articles of faith in the Aryan religion. In its exoteric interpretation this sign simply says: 'return', and was therefore a favorite sign used at hostels and inns, in order to convey the meaning: 'whoever is a guest here should come again." (pages 86-87, The Secret of the Runes, translated by Stephen E. Flowers, PhD.)

The underlining is mine for emphasis: "one of the most important articles of faith in the Aryan religion." Interestingly this symbol still survives in the Amish culture and the Pennsylvanian 'Dutch' Hex signs. I doubt that the Amish though appreciate the true significance of the five pointed star. When the Armanen were driven underground by the enforcers of the Christian religion sometimes their symbols and lore were covertly incorporated in the exoteric trappings of the said religion in order for them to survive.

After the forced conversion of the Germanic peoples the pentagram or Vehme Star survived as the symbol of the Vehme Gericht (secret court) who were very effective at maintaining law and order, working outside of the official judicial system. Much information about the Vehme can be found in Guido von List's Die Rita der Ario-Germanen, recently translated and published as The Rita of the Ario-Germanen by the 55 Club. Nigel Pennick also briefly discusses this subject in Chapter 1 of his Hitler's Secret Sciences which is sadly out of print. There could be a link between the Vehme Star and the tin star worn by lawmen in the Wild West and which is still in use today.

Wednesday, 7 September 2016

The Teutonic Concept of Time and The Threefold and Ninefold Rune Layouts



The ancient Teutons did not think in terms of linear time. This mindset was imposed upon them by the Christian church with its concept of a Beginning (Genesis) and an End (Revelation). Ultimately this thinking was encapsulated in the concept of the Christ (the Alpha and Omega). This alien and faulty thinking has had a negative effect on the psyche of the Teutonic peoples, inculcating a fear of death and divine judgement. Returning to our ancient Gods and embracing the knowledge of the Runes modern Teutonic man can escape this negativity and embrace a life of courageous action and purpose.

The Teutonic concept of time appears on the surface to be similar to the Christian one but as I have said, 'on the surface'. How did the ancient Teutons view Past, Present and Future? The concept of time as posited by the Master Guido von List can be formulated as : Arising-Becoming-Passing Away to New Arising and so time rather than being linear as in the Semitic world view, is in fact circular as in the movement of waves upon the sea. This analogy is the best way of looking at it. According to the Master Edred Thorsson this can be expressed in mythic terms: Urdhr (That which has become)-Verdhandi (That which is becoming)-Skuld ( That which ought to become). Thus the 'future' is not something which is fixed and unalterable but can be shaped by the Initiate if he or she has sufficient knowledge and will.

Most modern Rune Casters tend to favour the 3 Rune Reading and indeed this tends to be the one which I naturally gravitate to as within this simple reading we can engage meaningfully with the Nornir, those mysterious  divine ladies who give counsel even to the Gods. Who are we then to spurn their counsel?  So very simply the drawing of the first Rune represents the counsel of Urdhr, the second, Verdhandi and the third, Skuld. As Edred points out in Northern Magic. Rune Mysteries and Shamanism, the "dynamic opposition" between Urdhr ("significant [real] past action") and Verdhandi ("ever-present point of [real] existence") produces a "synthesis of which will result in predictable channels." This analysis of the first and second Runes by the Rune Caster enables informed choices to be made. The third Rune does not in itself predict what must come to be because the future is not predetermined but it is an indicator of the probable results of the interplay of the first 2 Runes. The Initiate who makes use of this knowledge can work within his or her own Wyrd to shape the future.

There is some historical evidence in support of the threefold reading of the Runes and this can be found in Tacitus' Germania:

"For omens and the casting of lots they have the highest regard. Their procedure in casting lots is always the same. They cut off a branch of a nut-bearing tree and slice it into strips; these they mark with different signs and throw them completely at random onto a white cloth. Then the priest of the state, if the consultation is a public one, or the father of the family if it is private, offers a prayer to the gods, and looking up at the sky picks up three strips, one at a time, and reads their meaning from the signs previously scored on them. If the lots forbid an enterprise, there is no deliberation that day on the matter in question; if they allow it, confirmation by the taking of auspices is required."(Germania 10,  Mattingley translation, revised by Handford)

"They attend to auspices and lots like no one else. Their practice with lots is straightforward. Cutting a branch from a fruit tree, they chop it into slips and, after marking these out with certain signs, cast them completely at random over a white cloth. Then a civic priest, if the consultation is official, or the head of the family, if private, prays to the gods and, gazing up at the heavens, draws three separate slips: these he interprets by the previously inscribed mark. If the lots are opposed, consultation on that matter is over for that day; but if they allow, the confirmation of the auspices is still required." (Germania 10.1, Rives translation) 

As an aside observation the reader should note that contrary to the assertion of Caesar (De Bello Gallico, 6th Book, paragraph 21) "They have no druids to preside over religious matters, nor do they concern themselves with sacrifices.", the Teutons did have an organised priesthood. There clearly was a Germanic priestly caste: what they were called it is irrelevant. Indeed the actual terminology in Germania; 'priest of the state/civic priest' is suggestive of this. Also the hotly debated issue of what these 'signs' were does not really matter. What is important is the method.

The simple 3 Rune layout can be developed if needs be into a more complex model. Edred in his aforementioned book discusses a 9 Rune layout where each aspect; Urdhr, Verdhandi and Skuld have 3 Runes a piece. This enables the Rune Caster to gain a more detailed interpretation from having more information at his or her disposal and the number 9 has clear mystical associations, being sacred to the Rune Lord Himself, Woden. The layout of these 9 Runes should form a Valknut. Not surprisingly he calls it the The Valknutr: A Ninefold Method. This makes the layout more Teutonic than the better known Celtic Cross method.